Collective drawing is, without doubt, one of the most enriching experiences in the field of experimental drawing. It offers multiple visions and transformations of content impossible to achieve when drawing alone. Collective drawing dissipates individuality by accepting direct intervention of other participants, without consultation. No part of a drawing is allocated, attributed or dissimulated. Forms are often left “open” to complete, to transform and to interpret. Like the random blots and lines that forms the initiating fog, interventions of others are a source of chaos and visions.


Stages of a collective drawing, 2003,
graphite on paper, 20cm X 20cm.

Collective drawings by Bernar Sancha and Jacques Desbiens



Collective drawing, 2003, graphite on paper, 27cm X 42cm.



Collective drawing, 2003, graphite on paper, 23cm X 28.5cm.



Collective drawing, 2004, graphite on paper, 66cm X 22cm.




Collective drawing, 2003, graphite on paper, 21cm X 30.5cm.



Collective drawing, 2005, graphite on paper, 22.7cm X 10.1cm.



Collective drawing, 2005, graphite on paper, 27cm X 28cm.



Collective drawing, 2005,
graphite on paper, 10cm X 20.4cm.



Collective drawing, 2006, graphite on paper, 26cm X 10.8cm.



Collective drawing, 2003,
graphite on paper, 11cm X 42cm.

 

Les Boules (The Balls): A surrealist collective in Montreal